Technical Analysis with Python: Become a Data-Driven Trader

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If you want to become a data-driven trader, you need to learn Python. Python is the most popular programming language in the world, and it’s perfect for traders who want to analyze data and make informed decisions. In this blog post, we will teach you how to use Python for technical analysis. We will cover everything from installing Python to working with charts and indicators.

What is Python?

Python is a powerful programming language that is perfect for data analysis. Technical analysis is the process of using data to make informed trading decisions. In order to do technical analysis, you need to be able to access data and manipulate it. Python is the perfect language for this because it is easy to learn and there are many libraries that allow you to access and manipulate data.

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Installing Python is easy. You can download it from the official website or use a package manager like Anaconda. Once you have installed Python, you need to install the following libraries:

– NumPy

– pandas

– matplotlib

– seaborn

These libraries will allow you to access and manipulate data. We will be using these libraries throughout this tutorial.

Charting with Python

One of the most important aspects of technical analysis is charting. Charts are used to visualize data so that traders can make informed decisions. Python has many different libraries that allow you to create charts. In this tutorial, we will be using the matplotlib library.

Matplotlib is a popular plotting library that allows you to create a variety of different types of charts. To create a chart, you need to first create a figure and then add axes to the figure. The following code creates a figure and adds two axes:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()

ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

Once you have created a figure and added axes, you can start plotting data. The following code plots two lines on the same chart:

x = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]

y = [0, 100, 200, 300, 400]

ax.plot(x, y)

You can also plot multiple lines on the same chart by using the following code:

x = [0, 100, 200, 300, 400]

y = [0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04]

z = [0, 0.001, 0.002, 0.003, 0.004]

ax.plot(x, y)

ax.plot(x, z)

As you can see, Python makes it easy to create charts and visualize data. In the next section, we will learn how to use indicators.

Working with Indicators

An indicator is a mathematical formula that is used to analyze data. Indicators are used to identify trends, support and resistance levels, and potential trade opportunities. There are many different indicators that you can use for technical analysis. In this tutorial, we will be using the following indicators:

– Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD)

– Relative Strength Index (RSI)

– Bollinger Bands

These are just a few of the many indicators that you can use for technical analysis. We will be covering how to use these indicators in more detail in future blog posts. For now, we will just show you how to add them to your charts.

The following code plots the MACD indicator on a chart:

from talib import MACD

macd, macdsignal, macdhist = MACD(close, fastperiod=12, slowperiod=26, signalperiod= Ninth)

ax.plot(macd)

ax.plot(macdsignal)

You can also add indicators to seaborn charts. The following code creates a Bollinger Band chart:

import seaborn as sns

sns.set(style=”whitegrid”)

data = close

ax = sns.lineplot(x=data.index, y=data, palette=”muted”)

ax = sns.lineplot(x=data.index, y=data + data.std(), palette=”muted”)

ax = sns.lineplot(x=data.index, y=data – data.std(), palette=”muted”)

As you can see, Python makes it easy to work with indicators. In the next section, we will learn how to use Python to backtest trading strategies.

Backtesting Trading Strategies

Backtesting is the process of testing a trading strategy on historical data. Backtesting allows you to test a trading strategy and see how it would have performed in the past. This is a valuable tool because it allows you to test a trading strategy before you risk any real money.

Python has many different libraries that allow you to backtest trading strategies. In this tutorial, we will be using the following library:

– Backtrader

Backtrader is a popular Python library that allows you to backtest trading strategies. The following code shows how to use Backtrader to backtest a simple moving average trading strategy:

import backtrader as bt

class SmaStrategy(bt.Strategy):

def __init__(self):

self.sma = bt.indicators.SMA(self.data)

def next(self):

if self.sma > self.data:

self.buy()

elif self.sma The following code plots the strategy’s performance:

cerebro.plot()

As you can see, backtesting is a valuable tool that can help you test trading strategies. In the next section, we will learn how to use Python to stream live data from the stock market.

Streaming Live Data from the Stock Market

Python can also be used to stream live data from the stock market. This is a valuable tool because it allows you to test trading strategies in real-time. The following code shows how to use Python to stream live data from the S&P 500:

import pandas as pd

import yfinance as yf

data = yf.download(“SPY”, start=”2020-01-01″, end=”2020-02-01″)

live_data = data.loc[“2020-02-01”:]

live_data.price.plot()

As you can see, Python makes it easy to stream live data from the stock market. In the next section, we will learn how to use Python to create a trading bot.

Creating a Trading Bot

A trading bot is a computer program that buys and sells stocks on your behalf. Trading bots are used by many investors to automate their trading strategies. Python has many different libraries that you can use to create a trading bot. In this tutorial, we will be using the following library:

– Shrimpy

Shrimpy is a popular Python library that allows you to create trading bots. The following code shows how to use Shrimpy to create a simple trading bot that buys and sells stocks based on moving averages:

import shrimpy

client = shrimpy.ShrimpyApiClient(public_key, private_key)

user = client.get_user()

accounts = user[“exchangeAccounts”]

for account in accounts:

if account[“info”][“name”] == “BINANCE”:

break

binance = client.get_exchange_client(account[“exchange”][“id”], account[“publicKey”])

order_book = binance.get_order_book(“BTCUSDT”)

ticker = binance.get_ticker(“BTCUSDT”)

candles = binance.get_candles(“BTCUSDT”, “12h”)

The following code plots the bot’s performance:

plt.plot(candles[“close”])

As you can see, Python makes it easy to create trading bots.

Closing thoughts

In this tutorial, we have learned how to use Python to:

– Master technical analysis

– Backtest trading strategies

– Stream live data from the stock market

– Create trading bots

If you want to learn more about Python, we recommend checking out our other tutorials. Thanks for reading.

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