Pledging Accounts Receivable: Definition, Example, Assigning, Meaning, Advantages and Disadvantages

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Accounts receivables are balances owed to a company by its customers. For the company, it represents an asset that can result in future cash inflows. Usually, companies track how soon they can expect customers to pay as a part of their cash budgets. The duration typically depends on the credit terms agreed with the customer.

Sometimes, companies may struggle to manage and recover accounts receivable balances. In those cases, they may look for alternative forms of finance, for example, loans. Companies can use pledging accounts receivable to secure these loans.

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What does Pledging Accounts Receivable mean?

Pledging accounts receivable is a financing method that allows a company to use its receivables as collateral for a loan. It means the company borrows money by promising the lender the right to collect on outstanding invoices if it fails to repay according to the agreed-upon terms. Once the loan gets repaid, the company regains the rights to collect on the accounts.

If the company defaults on the loan, the lender can collect on the accounts receivable. The lender may do so by contacting the customers directly to collect payment. Nonetheless, pledging accounts receivable can be a way for companies to obtain short-term financing without providing additional collateral. However, it is crucial to consider the costs and risks associated with this type of financing.

How does Pledging Accounts Receivable work?

Pledging accounts receivable is a financing method that enables companies to borrow money through their accounts receivable as collateral. Essentially, the company is promising to pay back the loan with the recovery it expects to receive from its customers who owe it money. A company first applies for a loan from a lender and provides information about its accounts receivable for pledging.

The lender reviews the information and decides on a percentage of the value of the accounts receivable that it is willing to lend to the company. This is usually around 70-90% of the total value of the accounts. Once the loan gets approved, the company assigns the right to collect its accounts receivable to the lender. The lender then advances the agreed-upon amount of the loan to the company.

The company then uses the loaned funds for its operations or investments while continuing to collect payments from its customers. If the company fails to repay the loan at the agreed-upon terms, the lender has the right to collect the outstanding invoices from customers directly to recover its funds.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of Pledging Account Receivables?

The primary advantage of pledging accounts receivable is that it allows companies to access financing quickly and easily. By using their accounts receivable as collateral, companies can often obtain loans more easily and at a lower cost than they would with other types of financing. It can be beneficial for small businesses or those with limited assets. Additionally, because the loan is secured by the company’s accounts receivable, there is no need to provide additional collateral.

A disadvantage of pledging accounts receivable is that it can be expensive. Interest rates on loans secured by accounts receivable can be higher than other financing and may come with higher fees associated with setting up and maintaining the loan. Additionally, if the company’s customers are slow to pay their invoices or default on them entirely, it may be responsible for repaying the loan out of its funds.

Conclusion

Companies can use their accounts receivable balances as collateral by pledging those balances. It involves obtaining a loan from a lender in exchange for the right to collect the owed amounts from customers. This process comes with some advantages and disadvantages for both parties involved. It may also cover factoring, which requires selling accounts receivable in exchange for cash.

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